Fragments Once Seen: A short book of Poetry

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In our Guide , you will see we have selected only a few, mainly those that you might immediately apply to your close reading; you can scroll over these underlined words for their definitions. MLA Guide. Introduction: Poking and Probing with Questions 1. The Title 2. Sound 6. Symbol 9. Form Introduction: Poking and Probing with Questions Welcome to the site! It also has by far the best introduction, a brilliant essay which puts Sappho in her context extremely well.

And because it's the most recently published, it's also able to include the magic new Sappho poem discovered in , written on a scrap of papyrus used to stuff a mummy. The irony of this one upset me at first, because she should have survived in far greater quantities than she did. But even so, the thrill of hearing the voice of a woman who lived six centuries before Christ was enough to catch my breath over and over again.

Generally speaking, women in antiquity are pretty silent. But Sappho isn't, and her influence, despite the meagre remains we have, is ginormous. It might sound hyperbolic to claim that all modern love poetry is inherited from Sappho, but in fact there's a very real sense in which that's true — so great was her reputation among Classical writers and the Europeans who, in turn, studied them, that it's quite possible to trace a direct line from Sappho, through Catullus, to the Romantic poets and from them to contemporary pop lyrics.

That's just natural, surely — just the way people speak? But no, it isn't natural, it's Sappho. She's part of our inheritance, part of our language. She's under our tongue. View all 10 comments. Simply and completely amazing. The bits of poetry that have survived only offer a small piece of the lost treasure of literature.

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Female readers run the risk of a life-transforming experience. Shelves: greek-and-roman. This volume which presents all the surviving poetry of Sappho in a mere twenty pages can be read in its entirety between the periods of a hockey game and is well worth the time spent. Seldom has such a brief collection provided so many superb moments.

The Fragment as a Unit of Prose Composition | continent.

Sappho is perhaps the greatest poet who we know so little about. She was born around BC on the island of Lesbos into an aristocratic family. She was married to Cercylas and had a daughter named Cleis. Many know her by the for her sexuality modern words of Lesbian and sapphic are connected to her. This part of her reputation seems to be connected to a play written three hundred years after her death.

In that play, she is portrayed as a promiscuous lesbian. In Pope Gregory had her work des Sappho is perhaps the greatest poet who we know so little about. In Pope Gregory had her work destroyed based on the portrayal in the play.

Others had a different view. Plato called her the tenth muse and her likeness appeared on coins. This collection is a reprint of the publication translated by John Maxwell Edmonds. In the last one hundred years, we have found more fragments and poems by Sappho but nowhere near the complete nine volumes. Edmonds explains in his introduction that Sappho ran a school for young women teaching singing and the choruses of the maidens used in marriage ceremonies. Book IX, in particular, speaks of the wedding ceremonies.

One theory is that Sappho's lesbianism may have just been the male voice in wedding choruses. With so little known about the poet it's really difficult to make a solid claim. Most claims one way or the other were made long after her death.

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The fragments and poems in this collection are all the ones that were available in What was discovered of her work is presented in this edition? Some words are filled in but well noted by Edmonds. The words flow well but being fragments it can be frustrating reading. Complete poems are a joy to read: The moon is gone And the Pleiades set Midnight is nigh; Time passes on, and passes, yet Alone I lie There can be little doubt of the popularity of her work in ancient times. That popularity continues into modern times.

So this is my first time reading Sappho, and I absolutely loved it. As a queer woman, I really wanted to read her because I wanted to feel her voice and I always want queer women to be represented in work. For me, this book was really special because of how ancient it is, which proves to me that queer people have been around since forever, and always will be. Fragmentary because she was a woman, and she loved other women. Many of her poems So this is my first time reading Sappho, and I absolutely loved it.

Many of her poems were burned of destroyed, despite the fact that she was one of Greece's first and most prolific lyrical poets. She wrote nine books! If I think about it for too long, I get angry. And then I get angry that years later, after finally acknowledging her importance, academics most of them white, male and heterosexual vehemently denied her sexuality at every turn. If I could say one thing to her, I would apologise, both for how she was treated, and how her work was treated.

This translation felt a little bit formal for me, so I'd like to read some others and explore more of Sappho's work and how differently her poems can be recommended. I absolutely loved her poems, though, and consumed them - perhaps too quickly. I'd love to reread this book again and just take more time to soak up her work. I enjoyed the introduction and how many ancient people wrote about her, and what they thought about her, but overall the translator can be quite dry.

I'm not sure if this will be my favourite translation, but I am excited to read another edition or translation because it'll be like experiencing the book all over again. Because of the translation and how formal it was, I will give this book 4 stars. C n ou und and I'm saying? Or s h ve i pact ur co p sion d enjoyment?

I have no doubt that Sappho was an accomplished and important poet, who shaped the genre and influenced many later greats. I'm not knowledgeable enough to know just how influential she was, so I take other people's word for that. For myself, I was looking forward to trying her poetry and finding out what this 'lesbian' poet had to say. I soon realised I wouldn't have the usual problem of finding a translation I liked, though that's still an issue, but here the problem is just to find the text itself.

It's turning up all the time, found in caves, dug up, or fragmented on pottery.

Poems and Fragments

It's really a miracle that any survives at all, but that doesn't make it an easy thing to read. There's just not enough of it. We know very little about Sappho, a few fragments and extracts that have miraculously survived the years. We do know that she was very highly regarded in antiquity - some of the fragments are preserved in writing style guides. This book provides an opaque porthole on to an alien world - affluent Greek society in the 6th century BC. The fragmented nature of what survives, and a cultural and religious ambience far removed from our own, make this a challenging read.

And yet there are areas of resona We know very little about Sappho, a few fragments and extracts that have miraculously survived the years. This means that one can appreciate Sappho's talents, and grieve over what has been lost. View all 4 comments. Jul 18, Nathan "N. A lost painting is lost forever: A copy is not an original. But with poems, every copy is the original, even a few lines scrawled on the back of a laundry list and stuffed into an Egyptian mummy. We hang on anxiously for every syllable that can be added to the lacework of loss, because Sappho seems to speak directly to us, as if knowing someday we would overhear.

View 2 comments. Loves the poetry, hated the formatting of the ebook which mashed up separate poems and fragments. Definitely need to get a complete collection of her poems. View all 3 comments. Nov 11, G. I enjoyed Willis Barnstone's lengthy introduction, but his translation of Sappho ended up being the one I liked least. But the source, though rep while eyes, the black sleep of night fr. But the source, though replete with delightful phrases and hints, is a tad disappointing—simply because it is lacking.

The book blurb already hints at the piecemeal nature of what has reached us across the time-gap of a millennium and a half. Papyrus scrolls and secondary sources have yielded poems that are rarely complete, and are in fact mostly fragments, occasionally consisting of a mere word! My heart flutters in my breast whenever I quickly glance at you — I can say nothing, my tongue is broken. A delicate fire runs under my skin, my eyes see nothing, my ears roar, cold sweat rushes down me, trembling seizes me, I am greener than grass.

To myself I seem needing but little to die. Yet all must be endured, since… fr 31 That ending says it aptly: yet all must be endured, even partial transmission through the ages, since…? Well, since we have no better, we will make do with what is left of Sappho. I received a galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The thing I received a galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Still the same. This book collects the entire known surviving works of the Greek poet, Sappho, who managed to cause her native island of Lesbos to become permanently associated with female homosexuality and have her own name modified into an adjective.

Unfortunately for such an influential woman, her extant works sum to a slim volume of fragments from larger poems. This seems to be a great loss, as what does remain is remarkable. Sappho famously dealt with the love and life of women as seriously as Homer dealt w This book collects the entire known surviving works of the Greek poet, Sappho, who managed to cause her native island of Lesbos to become permanently associated with female homosexuality and have her own name modified into an adjective.

Sappho famously dealt with the love and life of women as seriously as Homer dealt with the feuds and plots of men and gods and she did so in delightful, vivacious language, if these translations are any kind of reliable guide to the original. The translator has placed a commentary facing each fragment as well as providing a concise introduction to what is known about Sappho and the society she lived in.

These commentaries are often longer than the fragments they annotate, but they do illuminate and are worth the little amount of extra time they take to read. The entire book can be read with attention in an afternoon and if you are a fan of poetry generally, or of Greek literature, I strongly recommend you invest the time to do so.

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I don't think Carol Ann Duffy's foreword contributed anything worthwhile, but Aaron Poochigian's introduction and translation commentary make for some really interesting reading. That said, having read Anne Carson's translation of Sappho, I must admit Aaron Poochigian's translation pales in comparison just a shade. But that's subjective, of course. Overall, a good introduction to S 3. Overall, a good introduction to Sappho and her work. Ohhh, Sappho. The first prominent, female voice in Western literature, and - as I understand it - the inventor of lyric verse, Sappho's poetry is as gripping and relevant as when it was written, nearly three thousand years ago.

She writes with passion, beauty, and intimate humanity. But there is a dark history that has followed her over the millennia. Because of the homoerotic nature of some of Sappho's poems, she is the reason we have words like "Sapphic" and "lesbian" due to the island where she Ohhh, Sappho.

Because of the homoerotic nature of some of Sappho's poems, she is the reason we have words like "Sapphic" and "lesbian" due to the island where she lived, Lesbos. Gertrude Stein admitted she wrote for praise. William Faulkner said writers write for glory. In Late Fragment the "I" is asked, "And what did you want?

And ultimately, the reiteration of "beloved" makes the poem feel so complete that it reads more like a coda than anything fragmentary or "broken. The certitude of these last two lines, of the "call" that becomes something felt, is another reason I carry this poem around with me. Although that certainty is wonderfully undercut by the line break after "to feel myself," a pause that reflects the "even so" because it is rife with the potential to be anything. How rarely we get exactly what we ask for, how exigent the wait, but how wonderful when we do, as in the next line when the word "beloved" is reiterated, when what the speaker in the poem has desired of his time on earth turns out to be what he felt.

Her novel Stay was published in October. She's at work on a new book of poems. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

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